Moroccan Sight Hound “Toby” takes Best of Breed at 141st Westminster 2017

Welcome to the all-new ASLA Times, the official quarterly publication of the American Sloughi Association. This fully searchable online magazine will only be available in the future in a members-only restricted area of the ASLA web site as one of the many benefits of membership in ASLA. This is the… Continue reading

Read more via ASLA Times April 2017 — American Sloughi Association

Angry Tweets Won’t Help African Lions

“… hunting was never really the main problem.” ~ Richard Conniff for The New York Times

strange behaviors

ZWE_BWA_120928_1701_04284_F-Blog (Photo: Craig Taylor/Panthera)

by Richard Conniff/The New York Times

THE killing of Zimbabwe’s celebrated Cecil the Lion by a Minnesota dentist, on July 1 of last year unleashed a storm of moral fulmination against trophy hunting. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals issued an official statement calling for the hunter, Walter J. Palmer, to be hanged, and an odd bedfellow, Newt Gingrich, tweeted that Dr. Palmer and the entire team involved in the killing of Cecil should go to jail. The television personality Sharon Osbourne thought merely losing “his home, his practice and his money” would do, adding, “He has already lost his soul.”

More than one million people signed a petition demanding “justice for Cecil,” and three major American airlines announced that they would no longer transport hunting trophies. A few months later, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service listed lions from West and Central…

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Fossil Rim factors into scimitar-horned oryx reintroduction

“Fossil Rim embodies the spirit of captive conservation.”– Andrew Wyatt

Words On Wildlife

On the other side of the world, animals that have been extinct in the wild since 2000 are mere months away from roaming freely in their native land once again.

The first 25 of 500 scimitar-horned oryx set for reintroduction into Chad arrived in the country March 14. The project’s driving force is the Environmental Agency – Abu Dhabi (EAD).

With the green light, participants at 17 locations across America, Europe and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) were able to begin shipping oryx to Abu Dhabi, the UAE capital, with the goal of building a “world herd.” From there, the first 25 were sent to Chad.

SHO exit crates A couple of the first 25 scimitar-horned oryx from the “world herd” hit the ground running in Chad after being transported from Abu Dhabi. Currently in a fenced area, they are slated for release into the wild August 21. Thus far, Fossil Rim Wildlife…

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When Animal Rights Sabotage the Natural World

“It is becoming more and more apparent that HSUS has little understanding of the natural world, and even less understanding of conservation and wildlife management.”– Andrew Wyatt

strange behaviors

Deer-herd-web-2-26-06My latest for Takepart.com:

There are times—too many times, in truth—when understanding and protecting the natural world demands that we band together to stop the killing: The macho practice of shooting wolves in the American West comes to mind as an example. So does the relentless slaughter of elephants and rhinos in Africa. But at other times, protecting the natural world requires us to kill, and this is the painful reality some animal rights activists refuse to understand.

It’s not a failure to communicate. Animal rights groups are often brilliant at communicating. It’s a failure to reason in the face of scientific evidence, and it comes up almost endlessly for people who do the real work of protecting the natural world.

The latest case happened in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The city wanted to cull a booming deer population that is destroying the forest understory, damaging local landscaping, and…

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White Tiger: The Color of Controversy

“An interesting reassessment of white tiger genetics and the politics surrounding the issue.” — Andrew Wyatt

Doc Antle's Tiger Tales

Royal White Bengal Tiger ~ ©Rare Species Fund Royal White Bengal Tiger ©Rare Species Fund

White Tigers are NOT Genetically Defective
There is no evidence of a genetic defect inherent in the white color variant of the Royal White Bengal Tiger, notwithstanding the erroneous claims to the contrary by the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA). White tigers have a normally occurring, simple recessive genetic color variant known as leucism, much the same as the leucistic (white) deer common to the Carolinas. Leucism and albinism are not the same. White tigers are not albinos and do not carry the genetic weaknesses associated with albinism. According to a recent study published in Current Biology, the gene, known as SLC45A2, is a naturally expressed color variant that was common in wild tiger populations prior to extirpation by poachers, hunters and habitat fragmentation in the 1950’s.

White Bengals result from genetic mutations that are part…

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My Perspective on Cecil the Lion and Misguided Outrage

“An interesting perspective on lion conservation in Africa in the wake of the death of Cecil the lion.” ~ Andrew Wyatt

TWP BLOG

I have traveled and worked in over a dozen African countries in the zoo and wildlife industry for more than 35 years. Africa has fascinated me for as long as I can remember, and through my travels over the years, the fascination for Africa’s people and its wildlife is in my blood, making me feel as if I’m coming home every time I travel there.

To most Americans, Africa is referred to as a “country” rather than a huge complex continent encompassing every climatic zone, 56 countries, and well over 4,000 individual cultures. Due to this immense diversity, Africa’s wildlife conservation issues vary widely throughout the continent, with wildlife holding its own in some countries while suffering greatly in others.

There is no easy, one size fits all solution that’s works to fix the challenges facing wildlife’s survival. We here in the west tend to have an easy “solution” for…

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Who’s Really Responsible for the Killing of Zimbabwe’s Lions and Other Wildlife?

In the wake of Cecil the Lion being poached in Zimbabwe, some are placing symbolism over substance. But that seems to be the preferred method of addressing wildlife issues when the underlying realities are unpleasant or complicated. ~ Andrew Wyatt

TIME

Earlier this month, a 55-year-old American dentist named Walter Palmer went on a safari holiday in western Zimbabwe, where, over a 40-hour period, he maimed, cautiously tracked, and finally killed a lion. Palmer, a veteran big-game hunter, insists that he had secured the necessary hunting permits, unaware at the time that his target was the most famous lion in Africa.

Hwange National Park is Zimbabwe’s oldest and largest wildlife reserve, and the lion Palmer killed was its star attraction. It even had a name: Cecil. For killing Cecil, Palmer has become a figure of global hate, and the lion depicted not so much as a bloodthirsty killer himself but a sort of cuddly mascot, who would affably tag alongside caravans of delighted tourists. #CecilTheLion was a top trending topic on Google and Twitter around the world throughout Tuesday — although nobody seemed to notice that he bore the same first…

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