ZAMBIA LIFTS BAN ON HUNTING

“Like most range states, Zambia relies on hunting revenue for most of their conservation funding. Maintaining sustainable hunting is crucial to wildlife survival.” ~ Joe Hosmer, SCI Foundation President

Hunt Forever

SCI Member Tony Williams with his Record Book Zambian Roan antelope. SCI Member Tony Williams with his Record Book Zambian Roan antelope.

Washington D.C. – Today, Zambian Tourism and Arts Minister, Jean Kapata, announced that the ban on hunting, which was enacted in January 2013, has been lifted.

Safari Club International (SCI) and SCI Foundation maintained that the ban was counter-

View original post 300 more words

“We Kill Lions All The Time”: Inside the Anti-Predator Mindset

“Traditional cultural hostility by local communities toward lions is the root of human-lion conflict in tribal areas.” ~Andrew Wyatt

strange behaviors

 Two-African-lions

Whether they are trying to stop the killing of wolves in Idaho or lions in Tanzania, conservation biologists often come to a horrible moment when they realize that all their training has missed the mark. “I often think that I have three degrees in wildlife biology, and none of them is relevant to what I do on a daily basis,” says Amy J. Dickman, a senior research fellow at Oxford University. What she needs, more often than not, isn’t ecology. It’s psychology.

That thought occurred especially during two years she spent camped under a tree with two Tanzanian assistants, trying to make contact with a community of pastoral grazers, members of the Barabaig tribe. She was working on strategies to protect predators on the outskirts of Ruaha National Park. It’s Tanzania’s largest national park, as big as the state of New Jersey. It’s home to 10 percent of…

View original post 742 more words

Doing Dumb Things With Black Mambas

“… in black mamba country… a rat in your bed can be reasonably good news.”

strange behaviors

(Photo: Getty Images) (Photo: Getty Images)

Last weekend, I left my rental car parked overnight in a remote location in northern South Africa, where I have been working on a story. When I got back to the car the following afternoon, there was a freshly shed snakeskin on the ground by the rear bumper.  The biologist I was with (OK, he was a mammals guy) examined the head and ventured, “It could be a young black mamba.”

I contemplated that as I drove for the next four hours south to Pretoria. Off and on, I wondered whether the snake had sought shelter, as animals sometimes do, in the engine compartment of the car. In case you’ve somehow never heard of black mambas, they are among the deadliest snakes in the world and can grow to 15 feet in length. They generally use their considerable speed to escape rather than to attack, but they…

View original post 655 more words